San Francisco, California

The Transformation of Silence into Language and Action

Cassie sent me this pdf the other day, an excerpt of Sister Outsider by Audre Lorde (which I need to pick up immediately) and I really can’t stop thinking about it:

“I can't possibly teach Black women's writing—their experience is so different from mine.” Yet how many years have you spent teaching Plato and Shakespeare and Proust? Or another, “She's a white woman and what could she possibly have to say to me?” Or, “She's a lesbian, what would my husband say, or my chairman?” Or again, “This woman writes of her sons and I have no children.” And all the other endless ways in which we rob ourselves of ourselves and each other.

We can learn to work and speak when we are afraid the same way we have learned to work and speak when we are tired. For we have been socialized to respect fear more than our own needs for language and definition, and while we wait in silence for that final luxury of fearlessness, the weight of that silence will choke us.

The fact that we are here and that I speak these words is an attempt to break that silence and bridge some of those differences between us, for it is not difference which immobilizes us, but silence. And there are so many silences to be broken.